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Blog

Diamonds on the soles of your shoes - wading through garnets on Namibia’s Skeleton Coast

Date

22 Oct

Posted By

Alex Edwards
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Standing on the crest of one of the massive dunes on Namibia’s skeleton coast it’s as if the world has been filtered to leave only sand and sky. 

Here the mineral world prevails over the animal and vegetable.  It’s hard not to feel like a spec of organic plankton adrift in a sea of sand.

For two days I’ve been camping in the dunes behind Sandwich Bay, in the company of Bruno Nebe, a highly experienced guide who after a lifetime in this area knows it like the back of his hand.  Carrying a small simple camp we’ve explored  Sandwich Bay itself, the Kuiseb River Delta and the extensive dune system that surrounds it.

The dunes are mesmerizing on many levels; their extent and beauty are beguiling and there’s a fascination that comes with the latent threat the desert exudes; like staring at the patterns of a venomous snake.   Without Bruno, just how long would it take to lose my bearings in such a place?

But perhaps most striking are the shifting patterns and colours that the dunes throw up as the light shifts, which it constantly does. The picture is rarely still and the immense blond dunes create abstract patterns with their shadows.

Ridges and intricate ripples are etched into the surface of the sand, crisp and immaculate, constantly refreshed by the wind.  In places the sand has a vivid purple patina that glows in the sunlight.

Approaching one such area we get down on our hands and knees to take a closer look.  What we see are distinct patches of purple sand, lying in the troughs between ripples. 

Using our reversed binoculars as magnifying glasses, we zoom in to see individual grains of sand.  And at this point we realize it’s not simply sand that we’re holding in our hands, but gemstones.

The purple colour is a haze of garnets.  And as any prospector worth his sand will tell you, garnets are one of the better indicators that you’re in diamond country. 

To walk along the skeleton coast is a tantalizing experience; Namibia is the richest diamond producing region in the world, with almost 20% of the world’s gem quality diamonds coming from the forbidden region, a short distance to the south of where I’m standing at Sperrgebiet. 

It is entirely possible that amongst the trillions of anonymous pebbles that I crunch blindly beneath my boots, lies a diamond, created 3 billion years ago, washed out of the diamond pipes in the Kimberley region of South Africa, down the Orange river into the South Atlantic and thrown up on to the shore by the ocean’s gigantic sorting machine for me to find. 

Its tempting to keep staring at my feet, but I’m keen not to lose sight of Bruno…

We organise safaris throughout Namibia, including trips into the Namib Desert, which can be easily combined with a visits to the rest of the country 

  

Firewater and red ants: a Chhattisgarh haat

Date

13 Oct

Posted By

Andrea Hulme
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The dusty single track road through deepest Gondwanaland appeared to be going nowhere except to more dense forest but others seemed to know something different.

There was a steady stream of people walking along the roadside, babies hitched on women’s hips or with legs dangling from home-fashioned slings, men on bicycles or crowded into trailers pulled by tractors and we were all heading in the same direction.

By early afternoon we'd reached an open levelled area dotted with a few trees next to a hamlet. The air is buzzing with the sounds of gossip, bargaining, laughter, banter and the occasional shout from vendors struggling through the crowds with enormous sacks of goods balanced on their heads, a dangerously overloaded moped or a rickety trolley desperate to break free.

The weekly haat is one of the best places to meet the people of Chhattisgarh at their best, mingle with the locals and get a glimpse into tribal cultures. It’s a market but so much more than that; apart from all manner of goods being bought and sold, it’s a great social occasion too. Different ethnic groups put on their best and pour in from miles around to catch up with friends and family, local administrators and social workers come to convey their messages and hold meetings, disputes are settled and marriage negotiations carried out.

Under a patchwork of coloured tarpaulins goods are laid out on the ground: pots and baskets, foods such as dried fish, meat and mahua flowers at wholesale rates, toys, bangles, clothing and silver jewellery sold by merchants, farmers and weavers. Village and forest produce heaped in baskets is bartered for basic essentials like salt, tobacco and cloth. And of course, there's the local delicacy to savour - live red ants!

Away from the main centre there may be an outdoor film showing, the services of a palmist or astrologer to employ or opportunity to get an all-important tattoo before heading to the ‘bar area’ to sample the local firewater – rice toddy or mahua hooch made from jungle flowers stored in hollowed out gourds or plastic jerry cans. Sufficiently lubricated, before the light fades, you’ll find the gambling-loving shoppers betting on a cockfight, mediated by village shamans.

For more grass roots culture encounters take a look at our website, or get in touch to book your tailor-made trip to India.

  

Six places where they don’t grow brussel sprouts; a brief guide to an alternative Christmas

Date

10 Oct

Posted By

Alex Edwards
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© Alex Edwards Camping safari in Namib Desert

Brace yourself! Slade, Christmas carols on a loop, TV Christmas specials, to say nothing of the sprouts and stuffing. The Christmas machine is warming up and heading your way...

If it all sounds a little too scary then here's our potted guide to how you can avoid it all:

LOCK YOURSELF AWAY IN A MONASTERY in Bhutan.  Many people overlook Bhutan at this time of year, but  it's a great time to visit; crisp, dry, clear air, wood burning stoves, hot stone baths. Visit Bhutan’s most famous dzong Taktsang and discover a place where phallic symbols aren't rude (or funny)
HEAD FOR THE HILLS in Morocco.  Disappear for a few days, with your own private tented camp in the High Atlas and a camels to carry the kit. Then kick back in a Kasbah afterwards for a night or two.
PULL UP THE DRAWBRIDGE in India.  Take the chance to explore Rajasthan and the stunning hill forts of Amber, Chittorgarh, Gangron, Jaisalmer, Kumbhalgarh and Ranthamborethat which make up UNESCO's first ever serial cultural property listing
SPEND YOUR MONEY ON CONSERVATION NOT CRACKERS - in Laikipia by visiting Borana or Lewa Downs and supporting their Lion and Rhino conservation efforts
BURY YOUR HEAD IN THE SAND in Namibia.  If you're looking for total solitude then head into the thousands of square miles of stunning dunes above Sandwich Bay and discover gemstones beneath your feet and sleep on bedrolls beneath the stars

  

Travels on my elephant

Date

06 Oct

Posted By

Andrea Hulme
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Wrapped up against the pre-dawn cold that would soon turn into another blazing hot day we made our way into Kanha national park deep in the jungles of central India.

They were there, waiting patiently for us under a clump of trees, our leathery steeds already saddled with cradle-like howdahs and bare-footed mahouts sporting neatly groomed moustaches. While the mahout effortlessly shimmied onto the neck of our wrinkly vehicle I was glad of the rustic wooden ladder provided. Once on board, as we lurched off into the grassland I began to wonder at the wisdom of this expedition - it’s only when you’re on top of an elephant you realise quite how enormous they are. Although the Indian pachyderm is smaller than its African cousin they can still reach up to 3.5m high at the shoulder and weigh 5000kg. Quite impressive for a vegetarian.

It’s hardly Mark Shand’s epic 600 mile journey across India on his elephant Tara but even an hour or so of travelling this way gives you a completely different perspective of the jungle on a wildlife safari. While you can cover more ground by jeep the elephant is without doubt the best all-terrain vehicle there is; gullies and streams present no barrier and are effortlessly crossed in just a stride or two, sturdy branches are dexterously pushed aside, and dense tangles of greenery seem to magically open as if someone had whispered ‘open sesame’.  Just hold on to your hat and get ready to duck on your mahout’s command.

We plodded close to deer, monkeys, a variety of birds and an incredible abundance of butterflies none of which seemed to even notice we were there, our placid 22 year old elephant Pawan, born in Kanha, the perfect mobile hide.  Pug marks in the dust set our hearts racing and though we didn’t spot a tiger this time, I’m sure he wouldn’t have blinked an eye if we’d ambled by.

For more India safari ideas take a look at our website or get in touch to plan and book your trip.

  

The coolest picnic at Hanging Rock

Date

01 Oct

Posted By

Vanessa Janion
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‘Run down’ said our guide Tony as we surveyed the sand river from the top of the impossibly smooth granite monolith.

I looked uncertainly at the steep swoop down, like the neck of a brontosaurus, but the children needed no further encouragement, shoes discarded they ran with abandon to the broad base which hung over the glossy green pools of the seasonal river. They peered over the edge looking for catfish and pirouetted with joy at the setting and the moment of being. They then ran back up and down again until they collapsed at the top, exhausted. The bond with Tony, first met at 6.30 that morning, was now firmly established and the children’s enthusiasm for all that he said and told them was unquenchable.

This was a bush breakfast on our first morning out from Kwihala Tented Camp deep in southern Tanzania’s Ruaha National Park. Mangoes, papaya, pineapple, boiled eggs, bacon and sausages, cereals, toast, passionfruit jam, and coffee were laid out on the bonnet of our open-topped Land Cruiser. Piling plates high, we returned to sit on the top of the rock and scanned the river. Herds of elephant, with many young, were making their way down the river bed towards us, to places where they knew they could dig for fresh water. Male impala sparred with each other among their herds and suddenly a cacophony of noise erupted with their snorting and blowing as other males locked horns and chased off pretenders. Beyond the river bed, we could see giraffe and birdlife abounded.  We soaked in the scene for nearly an hour.

The scenery of Ruaha is breathtaking; improbably shaped Baobabs punctuate the landscape, tall golden grasses give way to salt bush and groves of sweet smelling wild lavender. The wide sand Mwagusi River, which flows fast and wide in the wet season, attracts the wildlife each morning and evening to drink from the pools the elephant dig. The wildlife is prolific but it’s the elephant that steal the show. Indeed, there was seldom a scene in which large herds of elephant, frequently with their young, were not visible and they had a cool disregard for us, allowing eyelash-counting closeness.

  

The best place to shop in India?

Date

26 Sep

Posted By

Andrea Hulme
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It seems ridiculous to travel all the way to Delhi just for the shopping - and this is the only place that I'll ever admit to it - but if you find yourself in India and happen to be passing through Delhi, pile into a rickshaw, squeeze onto the metro, hail an Ambassador - just get to the Dilli Haat.

Haat, the name for markets held in most rural areas, are usually weekly affairs. The one in Dehli is permanent, on a 6 acre site, with each stall devoted to a specific area of India. With 62 stalls, a 15 day change-over so that different sellers get a chance to showcase their wares and, although some  looked rather more established and there was talk of a pashmina stranglehold on the western edge, there's enough rotation and more than enough variety to feel everything that's good and authentic to buy in India has come to you.

Sequinned slippers, silver bangles, palmleaf fish, embroidered shirts, chilli chutney, saris, terracotta hooks, lamp shades, hand bags, table cloths, masala tea, sandalwood elephants, cushion covers, bile cures, pyramids of spices – everything dazzling in fantastic blues, pinks, oranges, greens and reds. Chilled coconut water after the first 3 acres makes all the difference for the next 3 and the smells and sizzles rising in clouds of corriander, chilli, fenugreek, cardamom from the food stalls is reward at the end.   

We stayed for hours and could easily have stayed for days, only our driver was keen that we see the Red Fort.  Apparently there's more to Delhi than shopping.

  

Bao - the oldest game in the world?

Date

25 Sep

Posted By

Vanessa Janion
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Stroll casually around any village or town on the islands of Zanzibar, and eventually you will be sure to come across two hunched, intent figures seated on a ‘baraza’ bench, their grunts of satisfaction or derision accompanied by the click of counters on wood.

Sometimes a crowd of spectators will have gathered, pointing and shouting garbled instructions. On closer inspection, you will make out the object of all this excitement – a flat wooden board punctured by 32 little round holes and lot of brown polished seeds. This is Bao – Zanzibar’s favourite pastime. 

The Bao games – the name means ‘wood’ in Swahili – can last for hours or even days at a time. Players develop little flourishes, scattering the counters (known as kete – usually seeds or pebbles or shells) expertly into holes or slapping handfuls down triumphantly at the end of a turn. Bao is played, under various different names and with many rule variations across Africa, western India and the Caribbean. Swahili people are proud of their version, known as ‘King’ Bao and claim it as the original and purest form of the game. Tournaments are held periodically in Zanzibar and on the coast of the mainland.

The object of the game is simple: to secure as many of your opponent’s counters as possible. Bao masters (usually older men) are said to be able to think strategically five to seven moves ahead, a level comparable with professional chess players. Children learn Bao as soon as they can count, scratching holes in the ground in lieu of a board and using chips of wood or stones as counters.

The African love of carving has produced Bao boards of many different sizes, shapes and forms. The board can be represented as resting on the back of a mythical beast, grows human heads from either end or is smoothed into the shape of a fish.

  

Village India - the shop

Date

24 Sep

Posted By

Andrea Hulme
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Among the clusters of houses washed cooling shades of blue, between the buffalo pens and the water pump, the village shop is doing a roaring trade in Werther’s Originals.

The road to the hamlet is a dirt track that weaves in and out of the forest and through paddy fields dotted with mango trees on the fringes of Kanha national park in central India. A veritable Aladdin’s cave the Indian village shop stocks the essentials and little luxuries that you can’t grow yourself or barter for in the weekly market. Stretched across the shop’s open ‘window’ brightly coloured packets of goodies invite you to draw near, but dare to try and step inside and the hinged wooden counter comes slamming down. Shoppers have to wait outside and ask for what they want; look but don’t touch – whether he’s 8 or 80 it’s the shopkeeper’s prerogative to handle the precious goods and pass them to you as he or she sees fit.

There are no special offers, extra large economy sizes or two for the price of one deals, just strips of tiny affordable sachets hooked over  strings between rafters and dangling just out of reach – one application of shampoo, a lone sweet (German caramel or otherwise), a single serving of mouth freshener or chewing tobacco. In the gloom at the back of the shop plastic screw top jars of sugar can be opened to weigh a few grams in ancient scales and take away in a home-made newspaper bag, or if your chickens aren’t laying well an egg or two can be wrapped in a used and discarded page from an old exercise book for safe transport home. On the top shelf a couple of light bulbs jostle for space side by side with hair slides, a mouse trap and miniature bars of soap decorated with impeccably groomed beauties.

But don’t be fooled into thinking rural life is completely without mod-cons. You may still only have a few hours of electricity a day, or get your water from the village pump, but if like the vast majority of people in India you have a mobile phone, you can get your top up here for just 10 pence.

Get in touch if you're interested in exploring rural India and we'll be happy to plan and book your trip.

  

Hand-loom weaving in India

Date

02 Sep

Posted By

Andrea Hulme
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In the unlikeliest places, tucked behind cow sheds in villages and down dusty roads in small towns seemingly in the middle of nowhere, India’s ancient tradition of hand-woven textiles hangs by a thread.

The origin of weaving in India dates back more than 5000 years; a fragment of faded pink madder-dyed cloth was found in Indus Valley excavations and in Roman times Indian cottons and silks were exported in massive quantities. The trend continued for centuries until industrialisation and demand for cheap mass-produced goods meant weaving skills were almost lost until a timely revival in ethnic and ethical products.

At a FabIndia unit in central India cotton from the region arrives in trucks covered with bulging hessian sacking, like loaves rising uncontrollably out of their baking tins. Cool rooms for spinning, dying and weaving fan out from a gated central courtyard where during the last 50 years the share holding work force has been producing fabrics for Habitat and EAST and are now highly sought after in its own shops in Indian cities.

The clickety clack, ching-ching of the looms become temporarily silent as people disappear for lunch leaving me the chance to browse the shelves piled high with colourful neatly folded fabrics that will be turned into table cloths, bed covers and curtains.

A day’s drive away in a handful of rural villages a charitable trust works with artisans who would otherwise have just two months weaving work a year and need to seek other employment elsewhere. The project is headed by Vijesh who, after graduating with an MA, decided to forgo a promising career in fashion and move instead to this remote part of central India.

Setting out on a moped to hill villages practising shifting agriculture his bobbin winding and sewing machines taken to demonstrate at local markets were initially viewed in horror and fear. Now, following training, they are skilfully used in dozens of homes, to create beautiful cotton khadi scarves, shawls and stoles that are exported worldwide.

In Bajag a weaver sits on his shaded mud veranda at a simple wooden loom constructed in a variety of ingenious ways (no two looms are ever the same) his legs dangling in a pit below and gets to work. The rhythmic clacking of bamboo and chiming of metal rings is absolutely timeless and the future of the handloom, for now, looks secure.

If you're interested in discovering local arts and crafts on your travels, get in touch and we'll be happy to plan your tailor-made trip to India.

  

101 uses of the mahua; tribal India’s tree of life

Date

27 Aug

Posted By

Andrea Hulme
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It seemed that the jungles of central India were dripping with mahua flowers and the air was filled with their heady, sweet yet pungent fragrance.

The flowers don’t remain on the tree for long; they bloom at night and fall to the forest floor at dawn, creating a cream carpet around their parent. At first light tribal villagers make their way through the forests to the trees dressed with new red leaves where the waxy blooms keep coming till the leaves turn green, and carefully collect each fallen flower. Simply distilled in earthenware pots, fiery mahua liquor is drunk in copious amounts but the entire tree is vital to tribal body, mind and spirit, from cradle to grave.

Mahua leaves are woven into cups and plates used for festivals, sticks of the tree are placed on the bride and groom’s hands during weddings and a corpse is anointed with mahua oil. The flowers can be eaten raw, boiled, or fried and eaten with salt and chillies. In south India Tamils use the flowers when no sugar cane is available, though with caution as an excess is said to result in unbalanced thought and even complete lunacy.

Mahua fruit is eaten as a vegetable, while oil from the seeds is used as everything from a hair fixer, for cooking and lighting lamps, to making soap. The crushed leftover matter then becomes a seedcake used as fertiliser.

Both the flowers and the oil have long been used in traditional medicine as a cure for a myriad of ills. The oil is taken as a laxative and to cure piles, while the flowers in various forms are used for heart, bronchial and eye problems, to treat TB, asthma, blood diseases, tonsillitis and to get rid of parasitical internal worms.  The bark is used to relieve itching, to heal wounds, fractures and snake bites.  Both the flowers and the bark are believed to be aphrodisiacs.

The wisdom of the tribal peoples is now being taken seriously and scientists are checking out mahua properties. One study has shown that mahua oil has more free radicals than extra-virgin olive oil and it’s also being tested for its potential as biodiesel. Watch out for mahua products coming to your neck of the woods soon.

Take a look at our website to discover more about the jungles of India on a tailor-made safari.